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Video: Game Planning For Competitive Shooting Success

Video: Game Planning For Competitive Shooting Success/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379cff6da22_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379cff6da22_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } A little forethought of a stage goes a long ways toward success in a competitive shooting match. It’s common with any athletic contest, physical execution gets the commendation. But like anything beyond the level of tiddlywinks, games are won and lost by what happens between the ears. Competitive shooting is no different. Concentration and forethought are as important as speed and accuracy, if not more so. Particularly at the pace pros move and shoot. Best Starter Kit for Concealed Carry: S&W M&P 9 SHIELD $394.96 guns.com Safariland IWB Holster $43.99 brownells.com Safariland Duty Belt $88.99 brownells.com SnagMag Ammo Pouch $LOW! gundigeststore.com Disclosure: Some of these links are affiliate links. Caribou Media Group may earn a commission from qualifying purchases. Thank you! Familiar with the mental challenges of shooting competitions — from practical pistol to Three-Gun – pro shooter (and competitor on History Channel’s Top Gun) Maggie Reese is a master at managing a stage. And like the majority of shooting sports in general, her success begins long before the timer beeps and she unholsters her gun. Using a USPA set up as an example, Reese walks through how she approaches a stage before shooting it, giving a step-by-step take on her game plan. In short, it's a process of ensuring there are no surprises so her shooting ability can take over. Related GunDigest Articles Braced 9mm Pistols: CZ Scorpion EVO 3 S1 Review Ammunition: Shotgun Slugs 101 What Exactly Is A Magnum? In particular, Reese builds a mental map of the positions she needs to take to successfully engage each target, as well as how to efficiently shoot more complex targets — such as a whirligig — to maximize her speed in the stage. Additionally, she takes into account where along the course she’ll need to execute key manipulations of her pistol, such as a reload — a make-or-break element of any shooting competition. If that isn’t enough, there’s also the question of checking gear, making certain it’s in working order and situated correctly so they aren’t stones to trip over en route to a top time.

Real Avid AK-47 Tool: Best AK Tool Ever ?

Real Avid AK-47 Tool: Best AK Tool Ever ?

Ask anyone who spends anytime around firearms and they will say the AK-47 might not be as accurate as the AR-15 but it’s a real work horse and ridiculously durable. The problem, if I can say that is many people don’t think the AK-47 requires maintenance. All machines, especially firearms require some form maintenance, and sometimes having the right tools to do it is all you need. The Real Avid AK-47 Tool might be the perfect all in one tool for the worlds most popular rifle. Do we have your attention? Real Avid is based out of Minnesota and has been featured previously here on the site with their Carbon Boss AR-15 carbon scraping tool. A little digging into the company we were pleased to see that they produce a full line of tools, carbon scrappers and other accessories to support a wide range of weapons platforms, best of all they are affordable and easily store in a pack or jacket pocket. What the Real Avid tool combines simplicity, portability and an attractive price point to give AK-47 shooters a pocket tool that addresses their needs. The tool allows you to clean the rifle’s firing pin, bolt, piston face, as well as assists in the disabling of the rifle. Another feature of the tool that people might overlook is the fact it can also help with the installation of pistol grips as well as muzzle devices. Image:RealAvid.Com Image:RealAvid.Com If you look at the above picture you can see that the Real Avid AK-47 tool has two piston scrapers that are different sizes. This allows the same took to be used on both the AK-47 as well as the AK-74 which is chambered in 5.45×39 mm. It’s little details in a design that makes a tool or piece of gear able to be used across different weapons systems. Smart marketing and clever engineering by the design team at Real Avid. Also seen in the above picture is a slot located on the left side of the blade, this is to help with removing the top hand guard on both the AK-47 and AK-74 pattern rifles. "The Real Avid" AK-47 Tool might be one of the most ingenious and handy tools to hit the market for the AK-47 and AK-74 family of rifles. The tool has a manufacturers suggested retail price of $19.99 and can be purchased from the company’s web site listed below. The video we have added, courtesy of the company does a great job of showing the strengths of this little pocket tool. We have ordered one and full intend to use it over the next few months as we spend the summer making our AK-47 dirty. What do you think of the Real Avid AK-47 tool ? Would you be willing to risk the price of a pizza on what might be a great tool ? The Real Avid AK-47 Tool can be found at www.RealAvid.Com

Steiner Defense Releases Red Dot with Thermal Overlay

Steiner Defense Releases Red Dot with Thermal Overlay

Steiner Defense has recently showcased their new CQT thermal red dot. This optic combines a red dot with a thermal optic overlay. This is pretty exciting stuff and I hope it makes its way to the civilian market. I for one, want to feel like the Predator as I shoot my M&P Sport at dirt clods baking in the South Texas sun. Video at Military Times … It’s worth a watch. Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print

5.56mm vs 6.8mm: Can a better bullet keep a bad guy down?

5.56mm vs 6.8mm: Can a better bullet keep a bad guy down?

There has been long running debate over which is the most effective round and what our ground troops should be using, 5.56mm x 45, or 6.8mm x 43 SPC. Well, for me, that’s a no brainer – 6.8mm of course. Why? Because of its terminal effects! In layman’s terms terminal ballistics is how the projectile reacts and what damage it causes when it strikes the target. But don’t let me influence you in any way with my opinion; I’d like you to put your reasons forward as to which round you think is more suited for our troops. To Neutralise – “To render neutral or inactive.” To Incapacitate – “To render unfit, an inability to perform.” Here’s my thoughts I have on several occasions witnessed bad guys being hit multiple times by 5.56mm (F1 ball, Belgian SS109 used by Australian troops and M855 used by U.S troops) at varying ranges and then continued to fight…not good!! A soldier needs to feel confident that the enemy he has just engaged is DOWN and no longer a threat. This means one less problem that you and your team have to worry about. The LOAC , law of armed conflict, outside of Law Enforcement and Counter Terrorism situations, prevents us from using additional projectiles other than a fully jacketed round. Supposedly to reduce unnecessary suffering and destruction. Well, fully jacketed 5.56mm ammunition does create unnecessary suffering by wounding and not neutralizing. I can hear some of you saying ‘ well, be more accurate with your shot placement ‘. Guys, I couldn’t agree more, especially in close quarter combat situations where you need to neutralize a threat immediately because reaction time is dramatically reduced. However, this can be quite difficult to achieve at times due to the pace of the contact, multiple targets, moving targets, obstacles, shooting on the move, etc. You may not get the luxury of pausing for that millisecond longer while your eye finds a sweet spot like the head. Because we are issued with ammunition that has a very small projectile which delivers low energy, new training methods have had to be developed out of necessity to achieve neutralization or at the very least incapacitation. One concept is to instinctively engage the chest with two shots, which in theory should buy you a fraction of time to then place a more deliberate shot to the head. Some CQB courses are now teaching engaging a target with up to six very rapid shots in to the center of mass . I don’t know about you guys but I for one have issues with this: Wastage of ammunition Hard to control the path of the rounds once they have passed through the body (increases dangerous space behind the target) More chance of a change over (swapping from primary weapon to secondary after a stoppage) Narrows your awareness until target is neutralized Slower reaction time if faced with multiple targets Compromise your position I guess I could be accused of over analyzing this but it is the ‘one percenters’ like these that have the potential to put you in a very serious position. You may not get the luxury of pausing for that millisecond longer while your eye finds a sweet spot like the head. The Belgian SS109 62gr (U.S M855 FMJ) contains a tungsten steel penetrator imbedded in the lead core that should (upon impact with tissue) help the projectile yaw and fragment. This isn’t happening all the time and as a result projectiles are passing through the body with minimal damage. If 5.56mm is the only caliber that we can use, then maybe relaxing the international laws that govern what is humane and inhumane should be considered. The use of a heavier soft nose projectile or even ballistic tipped (plastic nosed) ammunition would be of benefit. It would deliver its energy to the target and will also have the power to punch through thin obstacles like chest webbing, heavy clothing, vehicle skin, etc. It wasn’t all that long ago that soldier’s were happy with the 5.56mm ammunition that we were issued, but we were fighting a very different war than we are today. It was light, we could carry more, less recoil, etc. We also didn’t have a problem with conducting a battlefield clearance, ie; engaging wounded capable of continuing to fight or dead enemy as you fight through a position…it was a necessary evil to protect yourself…hence the term ‘Battlefield Clearance’! So whatever happened to the good ole battlefield clearance? Well, I’ll tell you, an increase of reporters in the battle space and social media happened! Posting footage of a standard infantry drill/tactic on to the internet via YouTube or on a news channel will change public and political support of the horrendous jobs that our brave men and women have to do. How many times over the last 10 years has this happened, sending the DOD, MOD or other coalition defence departments in to damage control? This has severely kicked our ground troop’s job in the ass, all because outsiders complain about how we have to conduct our job! People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf – George Orwell Years ago 5.56 would’ve have been more than enough to do its job, now we fight in different circumstances with different rules….so we don’t upset the tree huggers and armchair hero’s…and as a result we need a change in calibre! We need something that will knock down a threat with a single round without casting doubts about whether or not the bad guy is still alive or capable of continuing to fight. 5.56mm and 6.8mm Rounds: The Facts There are many ballistic charts that you can view on the web, most showing that velocity is reasonably similar between the 5.56mm and 6.8mm rounds. Compare a 77gr 5.56mm projectile against the 115gr 6.8 and it is very close indeed, however kinetic energy is anywhere from 40-50% greater at shorter ranges, and up to 35% out to 600 yards. The 6.8 SPC round has the same energy at 250 yards as the M855 has at the muzzle. At 600 yards it has the same energy as a 7.62mm M43 at 275 yards, M193 at 250 yards and M855 at 375 yards. Since the 6.8mm is of a larger calibre and greater sectional density than the 5.56mm, it will use this energy more effectively when producing terminal damage. Performance can be increased slightly by using 110gr ammunition, giving you more velocity and less bullet drop over range. The lower velocity of the 115gr ammunition combined with more kinetic energy makes this round less susceptible to deflection from soft cover such as foliage, shooting through glass (in the case of vehicle interdictions) and chest rigs. 6.8mm upper receivers will fit AR lowers, but you will need to change the bolt though and use specific 6.8 mags. I have fired 6.8 SPC ammunition from 5.56mm magazines but the heat that was generated expanded the mags – causing stoppages. The tolerances inside the mag are quite tight because the 6.8 cartridge is bigger in diameter. Although the calibre is larger, the difference in recoil is hardly evident and is quite controllable when engaged in rapid fire. Ok, 6.8 will significantly increase your chances of neutralization or incapacitation with a first round strike. It goes without saying that different types of projectiles will produce different results, and that shot placement is still the key no matter what type of round is used. However, we can’t always achieve this, so the introduction of a large caliber that fills the gap between 5.56mm and 7.62mm is vital for the safety of our troops and is necessary in our fight against terrorism. My guess is that money is the overriding problem. But perhaps it would work out cheaper to supply something that will do the job more efficiently without wasting ammunition…or lives!! OVER TO YOU! by Rob Maylor This post first appeared on loadoutroom.com Photo courtesy of Guns Guns and More Guns on Youtube

Gun Review: Smith & Wesson Model 629 Revolver

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f37745eba702_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f37745eba702_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } The Smith & Wesson Model 629 is a heavy duty .44 Magnum revolver that's the perfect protection for city and country. Smith & Wesson Model 629 Review Snapshot: A stainless steel .44 Magnum revolver, the Model 629 is based on the earlier Model 29 The potent Model 629 offers users protection from bears and other predators The Model 629 produced adequate accuracy, with groups around 2 inches at 25 yards Rugged and dependable, the 629 provides what users need in a .44 Magnum revolver For many years after its introduction in 1955, the .44 Magnum was often referred to as the most powerful handgun cartridge in the world. Several other handgun cartridges have exceeded its power since then, but it still remains a powerful round that is capable of taking most North American big game. Smith & Wesson’s Model 29 was the first production revolver chambered for the .44 Magnum , and sales skyrocketed after Clint Eastwood’s portrayal on the big screen of Inspector Harry Callahan, aka “Dirty Harry,” who dispatched the bad guys with one. Stories still circulate about movie fans buying a Model 29 and a box of cartridges, then after shooting one cylinder full of six, selling the gun and the remaining cartridges because of the sobering recoil. The Model 29 beget the Model 629, which is a stainless steel version of the gun. Both guns, the 29 and 629, have been in the S&W inventory for many years and continue to be excellent choices for the shooter who is seeking a recreational revolver that can also serve as protection against dangerous game, wild predators or humans intent on causing bodily harm or death. So, the Model 629 reviewed here is a versatile choice. Best Starter Kit for Concealed Carry: S&W M&P 9 SHIELD $394.96 guns.com Safariland IWB Holster $43.99 brownells.com Safariland Duty Belt $88.99 brownells.com SnagMag Ammo Pouch $LOW! gundigeststore.com Disclosure: Some of these links are affiliate links. Caribou Media Group may earn a commission from qualifying purchases. Thank you! One feature that makes the Model 629 so versatile is that not only will it handle the most powerful .44 Magnum loads, it can also safely fire .44 Special cartridges because that round is less powerful, is .125 inches shorter than the Magnum and comfortably fits in the chamber. The .44 Special not only generates considerably less recoil, making it pleasant to shoot for fun or practice, it is also a popular self-defense round with ballistics about the same as those of the revered .45 ACP. And because it is less powerful than the .44 Magnum, it generates less muzzle rise, allowing the shooter to get back on target faster for follow-up shots. Related GunDigest Articles Smith & Wesson Introduces M&P22 Compact Suppressor Ready Model New Gun: Smith & Wesson M&P380 Shield EZ Gun Review: Smith & Wesson M&P45 Shield Some people want that extra magnum power though for personal defense against human predators, and carry the Model 629 loaded with .44 Magnum rounds. Generally, the ammunition chosen is a hollow point design with a projectile weight of 180 to 240 grains. At the speeds generated by the magnum load, expansion and penetration both combine to deliver serious damage on the receiving end in order to stop felonious behavior. But the 629 offers even more versatility. When loaded with heavy, hard-hitting, solid projectiles, it is an effective defense against bears and other wild predators. So why not use hollow point expanding projectiles against bears? The answer is lack of penetration. Bears are big animals with thick hides that are much tougher than the human skin. Bears also have massive bone structures and tough muscles that work together to protect the animal and make it more difficult to reach vital organs. And doing damage to vital organs is necessary to stop a bear in the midst of a charge. A hard cast 300-grain or heavier bullet has the energy to penetrate hide, bone and muscle and do serious damage to internal organs, where a hollow point bullet is more likely to begin expanding on impact, which slows it down and reduces penetration, so it may not go deep enough to inflict charge-stopping damage. “Penetration is key, so hard cast or solid bullets are recommended for bear defense,” says Il Ling New, professional hunting guide and Gunsite Instructor who teaches, among other classes, Predator Defense. She adds, “At Gunsite, we recommend that a charging bear be shot in the face—ideally between the eyes and nose—to stop a charge as soon as possible. Other shots may take too long to stop the bear before it can do damage.”

Ranking The 10 Best Winter Gloves of 2020

Cold hands are sure to derail even the brightest of winter days. If you plan to spend a lot of time outside this winter, you’re going to need a quality pair of winter gloves to bring along. Whether you’re an avid backcountry skier or you prefer the winter season for your hunting expeditions, keeping your hands warm and healthy is critical to a winter season well spent. Our list of the 10 Best Winter Gloves will give you plenty of options to keep your hands warm and dry this winter. Also, be sure to check out our Buyer’s Guide section for all the critical factors to consider when choosing new winter gloves. 1. Dakine Nova Click here for the lowest price on Amazon These Dakine Nova short winter gloves are designed with a DK Dry waterproof insert and a combination nylon/polyester shell that’s finished with a durable water repellent (DWR) treatment. They are a great glove for a variety of winter activities, such as backcountry skiing and snowboarding, snowshoeing, and more. These winter gloves boast high-loft synthetic insulation and a 150-gram tricot ( 1 ) lining. The palm is also made of durable water repellent leather, so your hands stay warm and dry in even the wettest of winter weather. 2. OZERO Thermal Click here for the lowest price on Amazon These winter gloves are made of genuine deerskin suede leather and thermal polar fleece. Their design makes them perfect for winter sports and those often uncomfortable but absolutely necessary chores during the year’s coldest season. The OZERO Thermal gloves use a Heatlok high-tech air system with hollow fibers and microfiber that combine to provide warmth and breathability without excess bulk or a loss of dexterity. These gloves trap your body heat to create a thermal barrier that acts in conjunction with the polar fleece to keep your hands warm in temperatures as low as -30° Fahrenheit. 3. Helly Hansen VOR Click here for the lowest price on Amazon With shell and palm composed entirely of Grade A goatskin leather, the Helly Hansen VOR winter gloves offer a classic work glove design with a rodeo styling. They are an excellent choice for all winter experiences from work to fun. These gloves have sock cuffs with cinch straps to keep them secure throughout your day. The goatskin used in these gloves is water repellent and they include an anti-pilling micro fleece to keep your hands warm, dry, and comfortable. 4. Hestra CZone Contact Click here for the lowest price on Amazon The Hestra CZone Contact is a true multi-purpose outdoor glove made for cold weather and unexpected weather changes. The glove’s Contact-membrane makes them waterproof and breathable while maintaining a precise, close grip. These winter gloves are made of Hestra flexon 4-way stretch synthetic material. This material is windproof, waterproof, and highly breathable for warmth and comfort. Additionally, these gloves boast a reinforced palm and a silicon grip print for increased functionality. 5. Outdoor Research Alti Click here for the lowest price on Amazon This expedition glove has improved ergonomics and dexterity as a product of Outdoor Research’s revolutionary 3Dfit technology ( 2 ). With added PrimaLoft® hi insulation in the shell, these gloves also offer added warmth for all your favorite winter activities. The "Outdoor Research Alti" winter gloves are made of a combination of 90% nylon and 10% spandex. They are waterproof, breathable, and windproof gloves that also feature an upgraded liner for better moisture management. These gloves also come with an Alpen grip palm. 6. Smartwool Ridgeway Click here for the lowest price on Amazon These multi-purpose leather gloves boast a double layered thumb and forefinger for added reinforcement while shoveling or when gripping ski poles. These gloves will serve all your needs through anything a long winter season throws at them. The Smartwool Ridgeway winter gloves boast a terry loop knit interior lining to increase warmth and add comfort. The exterior of these gloves is 100% leather while the interior is 70% wool and 30% nylon. In addition, these winter gloves feature the high-quality Merino wool that the Smartwool brand is known for. 7. North Face Denali Etip Click here for the lowest price on Amazon These are the ultimate UIR powered soft-shell winter gloves. They’ll keep your hands warm while still allowing ample functionality, including in the operation of all your touchscreen devices. These gloves also take care of your hands using radiometric articulation, which keeps your hands in their most natural, relaxed position. The "North Face Denali" Etip winter gloves feature a silicone gripper palm that provides superior grip in cold, wet conditions. The soft shell on the back of these gloves blocks wind and moisture and keeps your hands warm and dry. These gloves are made from 93% polyester material and 7% elastane double-knit fleece that features four-way stretch capability. Finally, North Face’s 5-dimensional fit ensures consistent sizing across a wide variety of hand types. 8. Ironclad Ranchworx Click here for the lowest price on Amazon The Ironclad Ranchworx winter gloves have to be included in any conversation about the best winter gloves for work purposes. These gloves are made entirely of machine-washable, genuine Bullwhip leather that won’t dry out or shrink when wet. To protect your hands, these gloves include Kevlar reinforcements in critical areas for maximum durability. These winter gloves also feature patented roll tip fingertips that provide double-layer protection while ensuring improved dexterity. Added Exo-Guard protection keeps your knuckles safe from scrapes and cuts while the added terry cloth sweat wipe on the back of the thumb helps you wipe sweat from your brow even when it’s cold enough to see your breath. 9. Rigwarl Cold Weather Click here for the lowest price on Amazon These winter gloves are the four-season motorcyclist’s dream. They are made of reinforced leather to protect your fingers and their water-resistant shell makes them both windproof and waterproof. An improved fleece liner also keeps your hands warm even if you’re riding through snow and rain. The "Rigwarl Cold Weather" winter gloves are designed with touchscreen-compatible fingers so that you can make calls or update your GPS without exposing your hands to the elements. They also feature a reinforced leather grip palm to protect your hands as they grip your bike to steer through cold winter weather. 10. Carhartt WB Click here for the lowest price on Amazon The Carhartt WV winter gloves are designed to keep the most important tools of all protected against the winter elements. Your hands will love the ultra-soft insulation and Fast Dry technology that wicks away sweat when work heats up. These winter gloves are made of 100% polyester. The shell is a durable, all-purpose polytex with softshell trim and a reinforced PU ( 3 ) palm. These gloves boast Storm Defender waterproof breathable protection and a windproof insert to keep your hands warm and dry in even the wettest of work conditions. — Buyer’s Guide The history of gloves is an interesting one and dates back as far as 1,400 years B.C., to a pair of linen gloves found in the tomb of King Tutankhamen. The word ‘glove’ is closely related to the Old Norse word ‘glofi’, which could suggest that gloves were utilized by the Viking warriors of early Scandinavia. ( 4 ) Interestingly, leather has most likely been a common material used in the making of gloves for thousands of years. Today’s materials are much more sophisticated and suited to precise conditions. But with the invention of improved materials and the subsequent explosion in glove options, there are a few critical elements that separate quality winter gloves from their more ‘run-of-the-mill’ counterparts. To aid in your selection, this Buyer’s Guide will focus on these elements. Sizing Getting the right size glove is imperative to maximizing its effectiveness. A glove that’s too big won’t hold in as much heat and, therefore, won’t keep your hands as warm as they should. A glove that’s too small, well, we all know that just won’t do. When considering the sizing options of your top glove selections, the two major measurements you’ll have to consider are hand width and hand length. Hand width is a measurement of the full circumference of your hand around the widest part of your knuckles, but not including your thumb. Hand length is measured from the tip of the middle finger straight down to the large crease where your palm meets your wrist. These two measurements will be the most effective at helping you choose from the small, medium, large, etc. sizes offered by the top gloves you’re considering. If you fall somewhat between sizes, keep in mind that tighter is generally always better. As we mentioned above, extra space inside your gloves will lead to added heat loss. That said, you don’t want to buy a glove that’s so small you end up straining the material. This will not only be uncomfortable, but it will also greatly increase the stress on the glove’s seams and, over time, it will be more likely to rip or tear. You’ll also want a glove that’s long enough to tuck completely into your coat sleeves so that you keep your wrists warm. Insulation Before we get into the different types of insulation, it’s important to understand how different body types have different needs. On average, men generate more heat than women. This is generally true for people in their 20s to 40s versus folks over fifty. This is important to your glove choice because choosing a glove that has too much insulation can lead to excessive sweating, which is just as risky as having gloves with improper insulation. Considering your gender, age, average activity level, and basal metabolic rate (BMR) ( 5 ) will help you make a better glove choice in the long run. Now, let’s move on to the different types of insulation most common in winter gloves. They are down insulation and synthetic insulation. Down is an excellent insulator that is highly valued for its light weight, its durability and breathability, and its ability to be easily compressed. Although down is generally more expensive than synthetic insulation, it tends to last longer and hold it value over that time. Down does require protection from the elements by an outer, waterproof shell, which makes it a great choice for gloves that will be used for activities like skiing and snowboarding, primarily in cold, dry climates. In addition to being cheaper than down, synthetic insulation retain its ability to insulate when wet and also dries much faster than down. This makes it the ideal choice for winter activities that take place in predominantly damp climates. The drawbacks of synthetic insulation are: less warmth for its weight, increased bulk, and a reduction in insulation power each time it is compressed. That said, the most common gloves used for downhill and cross-country skiing utilize synthetic insulation. When you begin to look into these winter gloves, you’ll find that there is a lot of proprietary synthetics used to insulate gloves from different brands. The one thing that you should keep in mind is that you should never buy a winter glove that relies solely on cotton as an insulating material. When cotton gets wet, it stays wet, and it also stays cold. Avoiding cotton will help you choose a better quality insulator for your winter gloves. Finally, when you dig into insulation for winter gloves, you’ll find that it is usually measured in grams. This will lead to the question of how much “weight” is recommended for different environments. If you’ll primarily be using your gloves in temperatures at or above 20° Fahrenheit, it’s recommended to have gloves with 80 to 100 grams of insulation. If you’ll be spending your winter outside in temperatures below 20° Fahrenheit, look for gloves with 100 to 200 grams of insulation. Finally, for your Arctic adventures, search for winter gloves with 200 to 400 grams of insulation. Waterproofing The intent of waterproofing winter gloves is to prevent exterior moisture from entering the glove while still allowing water vapor from sweat to vent properly. This is a tricky balance, which is why it’s hard to find a truly 100% waterproof glove that will keep your hands completely dry in even the wettest, coldest conditions. The key is having gloves that will still keep your hands warm even if they do get wet. In general, there are three ways that glove manufacturers attempt to add waterproofing to their winter gloves. The first is by including a waterproof membrane that is laminated to the exterior fabric of the glove. The second is by placing a waterproof insert between the glove’s outer shell and its interior insulation. The last is by applying a waterproof coating to the glove’s exterior fabric. One of the most popular waterproofing technologies out there is known as Gore-Tex®. Many glove makers have emulated Gore-Tex using their own proprietary technologies. When choosing winter gloves, take some time to research these proprietary technologies a bit further to ensure that the gloves you choose have the best shot at keeping your hands dry. Dry hands are much more likely to remain warm. Touch-Screen Compatibility Winter adventures produce some of the most epic and breathtaking scenery. When you’re standing at the top of a ski run and you want to snap a quick photo before carving turns, taking your gloves off to do so is the last thing you want. That’s why choosing gloves with touch-screen compatibility is a great consideration if winter photography is your priority. If you need something with a little more weight and insulation than you can find in gloves with touch-screen compatibility, you can also consider buying glove liners that allow touch-screen operation. This way you can slip your heavy gloves off and operate your devices without completely exposing your hands to the elements. Some Added Bonuses In addition to the critical elements mentioned above, there are a number of additional features that add value to a good pair of winter gloves. Leather palms, for example, are essential if you’ll be using your gloves primarily for work purposes. Leather provides excellent grip and is also much more durable than common synthetics Wrist cinches can also be an essential inclusion if you plan on using your winter gloves for skiing or snowboarding. There’s nothing worse than dropping your brand new pair of gloves off the ski lift and these cinches will help you keep your gloves ‘handy’ while you shuffle your iPod or check your phone. In addition, many winter gloves offer a softer material on the thumb. This area is designed to help you clean glasses, goggles, or simply wipe your nose when the cold is really getting to you. This is a great way to keep glasses, goggles, or your face clean without carrying around a handkerchief all winter. Lastly, some gloves come with zippered pockets that are typically located on the back of the hand. These pockets serve as a place to fit disposable hand warmer packets on the coldest of days. As an added benefit, they also serve as added ventilation during your warmer spring skiing days. Frequently Asked Questions The need for a quality pair of winter gloves is undeniable. If you still have questions about selecting the best pair of gloves to suit your needs, however, this section will attempt to answer some of the more common concerns about winter gloves. What are the pros/cons of mittens versus gloves? The main benefit of mittens is that they can actually keep your hands warmer than gloves. By keeping your fingers together in one ‘compartment’ instead of separating them by fabric, mittens help your hands retain heat better than gloves. The downside, however, is that mittens come with severely restricted dexterity. This is why their use is typically restricted to skiing and snowboarding. If you need to do anything precise with your hands during the winter, mittens probably aren’t the best choice. What about heated gloves? Heated gloves typically feature battery-powered heating systems to provide added warmth on the coldest days. Some have different levels of heat output, but most run on rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. While they can keep your hands warmer, the batteries and heating technology make them heavier, bulkier, and much more expensive ($200+) than their non-heated counterparts. Another drawback is that you can’t use these gloves in even the slightest of rains without risking damage to the technological components. Why goatskin leather versus cowhide? For starters, goatskin leather is stronger and more durable than cowhide. It is also naturally water-resistant. Finally, goatskin leather is softer and lighter than cowhide, making it an ideal material for comfortable winter gloves. Are all winter gloves machine-washable? Generally, you should consult the manufacturer’s recommendation before washing your winter gloves in a machine. Washing them improperly can cause a significant decrease in their waterproof ability. A good rule of thumb is to hand wash any winter gloves that don’t specifically state they are ‘machine-washable’. If they do say they can be washed in the machine, however, it is still recommended to wash them on a delicate or low setting, and in cold water. What’s the best way to dry my winter gloves? Like the best washing technique, this will ultimately depend on the manufacturer’s recommendation. In general, though, it is advised to avoid putting your winter gloves through the dryer. The best way to dry them is simply by laying them out our hanging them by the fire, just not too close. Can you waterproof your own gloves? Yes, and the best way to do so is to purchase a waterproofing wax or spray. After your gloves are thoroughly cleaned and dried, applying the waterproofing solution evenly over the entire surface of the gloves. Apply extra attention to the seams and stitching, as these are your gloves most vulnerable areas. Next, allow your gloves to sit for around five minutes before wiping away any excess waterproofing solution with a damp cloth. Let the gloves air dry completely or tumble dry them on low if you wish to speed up the process. Finally, give them a good test by challenging the neighborhood to a snowball fight or snowman-building contest. Summary Cold hands can ruin even the best of powder skiing days, even if the rest of your body is perfectly comfortable. We hope you’ve enjoyed this selection of the best winter gloves and wish you the best of luck in selecting a pair that’ll keep your hands warm and comfortable all winter long.

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